SURG contributions to science
New species 2014
Stargazer mysid Mysidopsis zsilaveczi
SURG member Guido Zsilavecz first saw this species in 2002, but only a few years ago did he start seeing it more often. Specimens were provided to Prof. Charles Griffiths, who sent them to Prof. Karl Wittmann, who realized it was a new species. Prof. Wittmann and Griffiths described the species, and named it after Guido Zsilavecz. A media release from UCT caught the attention of the world media, who were fascinated by the eyes, and within two weeks it was on web pages everywhere.
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New species, 2012
Mosaic klopfish Clinus musaicus
SURG member Guido Zsilavecz discovered this species while assisting on a paper debating the Clinus superciliosus species complex.
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Likely new species, 2008
Burrowing Okenia Okenia sp.
SURG member Helene Zsilavecz saw this species on a dive at Windmill, and called over SURG co-founder Guido Zsilavecz, who photographed a number of them, including egg ribbons. Lack of collecting gear meant none were taken, which is a pity as it has not been seen subsequently, even after intense searching. Discussions with scientists revealed a similar species exists in European waters, and it is a burrowing species. Due to the lack of specimens it is not yet possible to ascertain whether it is a new species, although this is likely.
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Likely new species, 2007
Fireworks nudibranch Eubranchus sp.4
SURG co-founder Guido Zsilavecz photographed a few specimens of this species at an off-shore reef in 2007. Discussion with other divers revealed that Di Froude had seen possible the same ones the day before. Discussions with researchers revealed it most likely to be a new species, but as none were collected at the time, and it not having been sighted subsequently, means that this is not conclusive yet.
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Likely new species, 2006
Pierre's armina
A submission to SURG by Pierre Niehaus of something unusual (although it was first spotted by Eva Neves, his buddy on the dive) in 2006 baffled the team until browsing through identification guides revealed the oddity to be a species of Armina, feeding on a sea pen as most other Armina's do. Searches by SURG in the right area revealed a few more, which were collected and given to Dr. Terrence Gosliner for identification and description.
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Re-discovery/range extension, 2005
Dreadlocks hydroid Myriothela tentaculata
SURG co-founder Peter Southwood photographed this odd-looking hydroid at an offshore reef in 2005. After discussions with researchers it was discovered to be a species described from a single specimen in 1975. It has subsequently been seen at numerous dive sites.
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Likely new species, 2005
Clown anemone
SURG member Helene Zsilavecz photographed this little anemone at A-Frame in 2005, because it looked interesting. Searches by SURG members revealed that it was not uncommon, wide-ranging, and occuring in a number of colours, although the "original" version remains the most striking. Discussions with scientists revealed it is most likely a new species, and it is currently being described by Dr. Estefania Rodriguez.
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New species, 2005
Myzostoma fuscomaculatum
During the investigation into the crinoid shrimp Hippolyte catagrapha (see below), these "funny striped bumps" attracted SURG members' attention. Discussions with scientists revealed it to be a new species of myzostomid.
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Re-discovery/range extension, 2004
Bigscale scorpionfish Scorpaena scrofa
The first sighting of a scorpionfish in False Bay in 2004 led to much excitement, and specimens were subsequently seen relatively often on deeper dives. Identification without collecting a specimen was dificult, but eventually it was concluded that this species was most likely S. scrofa, due to it having been collected in off-shore trawls south of False Bay.
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Likely new species, 2002
False Bay cerianthid
First seen by SURG co-founder Peter Southwood in 2002, discussions with researchers revealed it might be a new species. It is currently being described.
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New species, 2002
Crinoid shrimp Hippolyte catagrapha
First photographed by Richard Steventon in 2002, it was seen again by SURG member Georgina Jones in 2005. This sighting led to a dedicated search for the species. It was described in 2007 by Dr. Cedric d`Udekem d`Acoz.
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New species, 1997
Bluespotted klipfish Pavoclinus caeruleopunctatus
First photographed by SURG co-founder Guido Zsilavecz, investigation into the species revealed it to be a new species, and it was described by Guido in 2001.
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Likely new species, 1985
Candelabra nudibranch Eubranchus sp.5
Photographed in 1985 by SURG co-founder Peter Southwood, it was photographed again in 2007 by SURG member Georgina Jones, and further specimens were found by SURG co-founder Guido Zsilavecz. It is currently with Dr. Terrence Gosliner for description.
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